When the French attack…

A consultant working with our Alcatel phone system encountered a weird issue that caused us some problems the other day. When attempting to install an Open Touch Media Server (used for receiving fax, for example), the entire vCenter client environment froze, and a reload of the page resulted in the following error message:

503 Service Unavailable (Failed to connect to endpoint: [N7Vmacore4Http20NamedPipeServiceSpecE:0x0000…] _serverNamespace = / action = Allow _pipeName =/var/run/vmware/vpxd-webserver-pipe)

A lot of searching the web led me nowhere – there were a bunch of solutions, but none of whose symptoms agreed with what I was experiencing; I had not changed IP addresses on the vCenter Appliance, nor had I changed its name, and I did not have an issue with logs reporting conflicting USB device instances.

What I did have, though, was a new OpenTouch server on one of my ESXi hosts, which did not have a network assigned to its network interface, and this, apparently is not a configuration that vCenter was written to take into consideration.

Logging on to the local web client on the specific ESXi host where the machine was running (after identifying that…), and selecting the machine in question, I got a warning message specifying the network problem, and a link to the Action menu. Simply selecting a valid network and saving the machine configuration was enough to allow me to ssh to the vCenter Appliance and start the vmware-vpxd service:

# service-control –start vmware-vpxd

We’ll just have to see how we proceed from here…

Manually removing ghost vVols from IBM SVC-based storage

As part of my evaluation of presenting vVols to vCenter from an IBM FlashSystem V9000, I decided to start from scratch after learning a bit about the benefits and limitations of the system. That is: I like vVols a lot, but I learned some things in my tests that I wanted to do differently in actual production.

Unfortunately, once I had migrated my VMs off the vVol datastores, I still couldn’t detach the relevant storage resources from the storage service in Spectrum Control Base. The error message was clear enough: I’m not allowed to remove a storage resource that still has vVols on it. My frustration was based in the fact that vCenter showed no VMs nor files on any of the vVol datastores, but I could clearly see them (labeled as “volume copies”) in the “Volumes by Pool” section in the SVC webUI on the V9000.

At least as of version 7.6.x of the SVC firmware, there is no way of manually removing vVols from the GUI, and as usual in such cases, we turn to the CLI:
I connected to the V9000 using ssh, taking care to log on as my VASA user. All virtual disks on the V9000 can be listed using the lsvdisk command. The first two columns are their ID and name, and any of these parameters can be fed to the rmvdisk command to manually remove a volume.

Just to be clear: The rmvdisk command DELETES stuff. Do not use it unless you really mean it! With that warning out of the way; once I had removed the volumes and waited a couple of minutes for the change to propagate to Spectrum Control Base, detaching storage resources from storage services was a breeze.

FTP server on IIS

I recently had cause to set up an FTP server for internal use on a Windows server, and I bumped into an issue that took me a little while to figure out, since I had never done it before:
I wanted to give a domain user account an isolated directory, and started out by creating the user directory inside the inetpub\ftproot folder. However when I tried to log on with a client, it would I’ve me an error message “530 User cannot log in, home directory inaccessible”.

Turns out the answer was simply to create a subdirectory to the ftproot with the name of the domain, and then move the user directory inside that one.