Simple DNS over HTTPS setup

I read that Mozilla had been named an Internet villain by a number of British ISPs, for supporting encrypted DNS queries using DNS over HTTPS. I guess the problem is that an ISP by default knows which sites you browse even though the traffic itself is usually encrypted nowadays, since the traditional way of looking up the IP address of a named service has been performed in plaintext.

The basic fact is that knowledge of what you do on the Internet can be monetized – but the official story naturally is a combination of “Terrorists!” and “Think about the children!”. As usual.

Well, I got a sudden urge to become an Internet villain too, so I put a DoH resolver in front of my Bind server at home. Cloudflare – whom I happen to trust when they say they don’t sell my data – provide a couple of tools to help here. I chose to go with Cloudflared. The process for installing the daemon is pretty well documented on their download page, but for the sake of posterity looks a bit like this:

First we’ll download the installation package. My DNS server is a Debian Stretch machine, so I chose the correct package for this:

wget https://bin.equinox.io/c/VdrWdbjqyF/cloudflared-stable-linux-amd64.deb
dpkg -i cloudflared-stable-linux-amd64.deb

Next we need to configure the service. It doesn’t come with a config file out of the box, but it’s easy enough to read up on their distribution page what it needs to contain. I added a couple of things beyond the bare minimum. The file is stored as /etc/cloudflared/config.yml.

---
logfile: /var/log/cloudflared.log
proxy-dns: true
proxy-dns-address: 127.0.0.1
proxy-dns-port: 5353
proxy-dns-upstream:
         - https://1.1.1.1/dns-query
         - https://1.0.0.1/dns-query

After this we make sure the service is active, and that it’ll restarts if we restart our server:

cloudflared service install
service cloudflared start
systemctl enable cloudflared.service

Next let’s try it out:

dig @127.0.0.1 -p 5353 slashdot.org

If we get an answer, it works.

The next step is to make Bind use our cloudflared instance as a DNS forwarder. We’ll edit /etc/bind/named.conf.options. The new forwarder section should look like this:

(...)
options {
(...)
	forwarders {
                127.0.0.1 port 5353;
	};
(...)
};

Restart bind (service bind9 restart), and try it out by running dig @127.0.0.1 against a service you don’t usually visit. Note the absence of a port number in the latter command: if it keeps working, the chain is up and running.